Faithful Anglicans in the Mother Church ask for global support

 

letterThe faithful remnant in the Church of England is asking Anglicans worldwide to join with them in supporting the renewal of the orthodox faith in the British Isles. A letter published July 25 in the Daily Telegraph states their case.

SIR – Recent actions in the General Synod in pursuit of a culture that denies biblical ethics, as they have been practised and understood “at all places and in all times”, have caused many Anglicans great concern.

There are times, particularly in the face of social disintegration, when it is the duty of the Church to be counter‑cultural. The failure of the House of Bishops to uphold the teaching of the Bible and of the Universal Church in this area is very disappointing, if not surprising.

Booing of traditionalists and the levels of personal abuse aimed at them during the Synod have only deepened mistrust between the different sides.

There are now effectively two opposed expressions of Anglicanism in this country. One has capitulated to secular values, and one continues to hold the faith “once delivered to the saints”.

We and others stand with the majority of faithful Anglicans across the globe, in prioritising Scripture and the unanimous teaching of the universal Church over secular fashion. We note the results of this same conflict in North America, even as we look for and pray for a similar renewal of orthodox Anglicanism and of Anglican structures in these islands.

Rt Rev Michael Nazir-Ali
Bishop of Rochester, 1994-2009

Rt Rev John Fenwick
Bishop Primus, Free Church of England

Rev Gavin Ashenden
Former Chaplain to the Queen

Rev Mark Burkill
Chairman of Reform

Andrea Minchello Williams
CEO of Christian Concern

Rev William Taylor
Chairman of Renew

Rev Nigel Atkinson
Vicar of St John’s, Knutsford

Rt Rev John Ellison
Executive of Anglican Mission in England (AMiE)

Rev Lee McMunn
Mission Director of AMiE

Rev Tim Chapman
Minister of Christ Church, South Cambridgeshire
AMiE

Rev Paul Darlington
Vicar of Oswestry, Holy Trinity
Chairman of Church Society

Mary Durlacher
Member of General Synod

Rev Dick Farr
Chairman of Church Society Trust

Fr Martin Hislop
St Luke’s, Kingston upon Thames

Rev Canon Nigel Juckes
Incumbent, Parish of Llandogo

Rt Rev Josep Miquel Ferrer
Free Church of England

Rev Steven Hanna
St Elisabeth’s Church, Dagenham

Rt Rev Paul Hunt
General Secretary of Free Church of England

Rev James Paice
Vicar of St Luke’s, Wimbledon Park
Trustee of Southwark Good Stewards Trust

Rev Dr Peter Sanlon
Vicar of St Mark’s, Tunbridge Wells
Convener of Anglican Partnership Synod

Rev Dr Andrew Symes
Executive Secretary of Anglican Mainstream

Rev Melvin Tinker
Vicar of St John’s, Newland

Rev Robin Weekes
Minister Emmanuel Church Wimbledon & Chairman of Reform Southwark

To support this movement, please add your name to the letter here.

Local parish council rebukes Archbishop of York for rejecting the Gospel

The Church of England, as an institution, is thoroughly apostate. The recently concluded General Synod laid to rest any lingering doubts about that sad fact. As Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby is a train wreck. Worse, however, is his colleague from York. John Sentamu is a prairie fire consuming every last vestige of orthodoxy in the Mother Church. His behavior at Synod, as witnessed below, was particularly odious.

While the institutional structures of the Church of England now appear to be irretrievably lost, there remain a few faint but faithful voices of truth among the local parishes. Among them is the parish of St. John, Newland, whose parochial church council (PCC) has issued a stinging rebuke to Archbishop Sentamu, calling upon him to repent for his ungodly conduct in office.

An Open Letter containing a Resolution from St John, Newland PCC, 17th July 2017

To his Grace, the Archbishop of York,

The PCC considers the response by the Archbishop of York to Mrs Andrea Williams’ amendment of Item 48 at the July General Synod of the Church of England, 2017, in terms of what was said, to indicate theological ineptitude at best and error at worst; and how it was said, as intemperate and ungodly. As such there was a failure to meet the standard required of a bishop according to Titus 1:7-9. Neither did the Archbishop display his canonical duty to ‘with all faithful diligence…. banish and drive away all erroneous and strange doctrine contrary to God’s Word; and both privately and openly to call upon and encourage others to the same’ in relation to Item 58.

Accordingly, this PCC no longer has any confidence in the Archbishop of York in ‘all things spiritual’ and requests that he expresses repentance for what took place.

The PCC looks forward to receiving an indication of repentance from the Archbishop and will offer prayers to that end.

The PCC has also been grieved by the general direction of the Synod and the appalling manner in which those who hold to the teachings of Jesus have been ridiculed, mocked and scorned. We fear that the Synod has imbibed the ‘spirit of the age’ and we request satisfactory assurances from the leadership that this kind of behaviour is not acceptable and that it will work towards creating a more courteous and biblically responsive environment in the future.

In the meantime, to indicate our serious concern with the present state of affairs the PCC will withhold its free will offering until further notice.

The resolution was passed unanimously.

Mr Timothy Benstead,
Lay Chair of St John, Newland, PCC
17th July 2017

No one is holding their breath waiting for the Archbishop to repent but the courage of the St. John PCC does demonstrate that the faithful in England still have some breath of life themselves.

Herod’s ignominious end: An act of judgment and mercy

HerodAntipas_v1_FullActs 12.20-24 records the account of the ignominious end of the reign of Herod Antipas. Death befalls the king “because he did not give glory to God” (v. 23b). No doubt he gloried, instead, in his own vanity, relishing the accolades of the crowd which declared, “The voice of a god, and not of a man!” (v. 22). It was precisely the kind of praise Herod wanted from “the people of Tyre and Sidon,” who had come to him to ask for peace. But it was a coerced form of praise. Herod had staged the event, having “put on his royal robes,” taken “his seat upon the throne, and delivered an oration to them” (v. 21).

It was the perfect setting for a king to garner the praise of his fickle subjects. “Look at me!” Herod says. “See my flowing robes. Look at my glorious throne. Hear my voice. Am I not a god to you? Do I not deserve your praise and adoration?”

But, as the saying goes, be careful for what you wish. Herod got the praise of the people, but his failure to praise God cost him his life. As the people glory in his vanity, Herod is struck down by “an angel of the Lord” (v. 23a). God can tolerate no pretenders. To him alone belongs the glory. Human beings were created to glorify God. When they act contrary to creation, they suffer the consequences. For Herod, those consequences were most severe.

God’s striking down of Herod was no mere act of petulant jealousy. In failing to give glory to God, Herod was also failing the people under his authority. He was causing them to bow at the feet of a mere man and proclaim him a god. In pouring out his wrath on Herod, God was showing mercy to the people who had been acting out of ignorance.

Herod’s rotting corpse was “eaten by worms.” In fact, a strict reading of the text suggests the worms starting feasting on him even before “he breathed his last.” Whatever the order of events, it was a gruesome end.

“But the word of God increased and multiplied.” Did the people, having seen Herod struck down, then glorify God? Perhaps some did but, as illustrated in today’s Gospel reading, some people are hard of hearing even when God does speak through the Person of his own Son.